Health Safety

Belize is welcoming travelers again, with a Tourism Gold Standard program in place designed to keep you safe and recognized as one of the top in the world. See our Health & Safety page for up-to-date details related to COVID-19 vaccinations, testing requirements and everything else you need to know in order to have the Belize vacation of your dreams.

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Why you should visit Belize during shoulder season

We often say there’s no bad time to visit Belize, and with good reason. With having only two seasons – wet and dry – Belize basks in delightful tropical warmth all year round. This means most of our North American friends flock to our Jewel during the cold, wintry months. While December to February may be our peak seasons for this reason, there is a sweet spot just before industry prices skyrocket. Shoulder season.

High season has many of the activities and cool weather, where low season has the large discounts and lack of crowds. But what if you want a little bit of both? Head to Belize between August to October and you’ll see there’s so much to take advantage of.

Weather

Visiting in October or November as opposed to the summer relieves you from knowing first-hand what the Belizean sun is capable of (many shades of tan!) The rainy season is petering out during this time, and you can still enjoy many of the outdoor activities such as cave tubing, ziplining and snorkeling.

Discounted stays

Because the high season is still a little ways away, many hotels offer exorbitant discounts for their stellar stays. Up to more than $100 off a luxury stay is something that shouldn’t be passed up. There are many packages as well for honeymooners, family stays and even special offers that expire right before high season hits. Take full advantage!

No crowds

As mentioned before, most travelers find their way to Belize during the winter months. By traveling in the shoulder season, you have the added benefit of a not navigating through many tourists when it comes to attractions or tours. Even if our Maya sites are devoid of large gatherings at any point in time, it’s still pretty cool to gaze at the looming temples with not a single soul in sight other than you, your travel companions and your tour guide.